Back of the Book Issues

Wrangel Refugee Issues


Note - in many cases, clicking on the image may open a larger copy of the image for better inspection.


The forces commanded by General Peter Wrangel represented the "last hope" of the non Bolshevik Russians, but alas, was of little effective use in combating the spread of the Bolsheviks, and after a short lived time occupying the province of Taurida were beaten back and forced to abandon Russia on 15 November, 1920, whereupon they and many refugees moved to refugee camps located variously in the Aegean Islands, Serbia, Tunis and Turkey.

They issued a separate series of overprinted stamps to the six that they issued while controlling Taurida.  In an increasingly disorganised fashion, they would overprint whatever they could find in the way of other stamps, with the intended use being for correspondence between the camps.

Scott covers these stamps at the end of their Russian Offices in Turkey section - numbers 232 - 376. Stanley Gibbons and Michel have separate sections.  There are about 174 different stamps issued by General Wrangel's refugee groups.

These surcharged stamps were originally printed in Constantinople, and were subsequently reprinted in Paris solely for collectors.  Actual postally used stamps and covers are very rare, although CTO and fakes do exist.


 

 

Catalog Info

Image

Notes

S 236 MLH with double overprint, described as signed on back.  Opened for $5 and four bidders took it up to $8.  Scott values the regular stamp at 60 cents.  Neither Scott nor SG discuss premiums for double overprints (Jul 01).
S 242 var eBay described as "missing value (1000r) in the overprint."  MNH  Opened for $1 and five people bid up to $15.45.  Scott does not refer to this and neither does SG.  Scott value the regular stamp at 15c and SG at 20p (about 30c) (Aug 00).
S 252a invert 1921 issue, MLH, inverted overprint.  Opened for $1 and eight people bid up to $10.65.  Scott values at $2 and seven of the bidders offered this amount or more (Aug 00).
S 265 dbl oprint eBay described as MLH and probable double overprint.  Opened for $3 and sold at that price.  Scott values a regular stamp at $6.50.  Note the curious contradiction in selling price between this stamp and S236 (sold by the same seller, a day apart). (Jul 01).
S 268A eBay described as MLH.  Opened for $2.50 and four people bid up to $9.50.  Scott values at $10 (June 00).
S 268B eBay described as MLH.  Opened for $2.50 and four people bid up to $11.11.  Scott values at $10 (June 00).
S 291b eBay described as MLH.  Opened for $1.25 and five people bid up to $8.03.  Scott values $4.75 and four of the bidders bid this amount or higher (June 00).
S 333-8 eBay described as MLH.  Opened for $1.25 and six people bid up to $22.50.  Scott values at $5.20 and two of the bidders bid over this amount (June 00).
S 316 eBay MLH opened for $1.25 and four people bid up to $5.60.  Scott values at $5.25 (June 00).
S 338A-49A eBay MLH opened for $2 and eight people bid it up to $10.65.  Scott values at $10.15 (June 00).
S 341 invert eBay - MLH with an inverted surcharge.  Opened for $10 and three people bid it up to $13.09.  Scott does not value, the basic stamp is a 15c stamp and most Wrangel inverted surcharges are valued at $1.50-$5 (June 00),
S 350-7 eBay MLH opened for $2.25 and six people bid up to $21.50.  Scott values at $10.05 and two people bid over that (June 00).

353 only, MH, opened for $1.95 and sold for that price.  Scott values at $7.75 (June 00).

S 358-9 eBay MLH opened for $1.25 and seven people bid it up to $22.50.  Scott values for $5 and five of the bidders offered over this (June 00).
     
     
     
     
     
     
collection This collection of stamps was offered for sale, described as purchased in 1936 for $10.36, MH.  Certainly the interesting stock sheet suggests that this was the asking price at some time, and it is fascinating to compare the values (1936 catalog values, perhaps?) with Scott values today.  Although, of course, the 3c valued stamps now have "increased" in value all the way up to the new minimum value of 15c, without exception, the higher value stamps have all decreased!!!  This is very surprising, particularly when you consider that $1 back in 1936 is probably worth something like $10 today, and so - just to keep up with inflation, one would have thought that the $1 stamps would now be shown as $10 in Scott, but instead, they are showing more like 50c - they have gone down in real value by perhaps 2000% in 64 years.  Now would anyone like to recommend stamps as an investment???  :)  The lot opened for $1 and nine people bid up to $12.50, which is probably a bit more than Scott values these stamps for today.  (Aug 00).

 

 


 

This page last modified on October 12, 2013